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When Did Vanity Sizing Start?

Vanity sizing is a pervasive problem in modern society. While it has no measurable impact on health, the environmental costs of returning unused clothing have soared. Furthermore, the waste of returned clothing clogs landfills and wreaks havoc on the economy. What’s more, vanity sizing has become a billion-dollar annual business. So, when did vanity sizing start?

Clothing sizes were not standardized for most of human history. Many garments were tailor-made or handmade. However, the advent of mass-production created issues and brands began to shift metrics in an effort to make consumers appear thinner. A woman’s size 12 in 1958 is now considered to be a size six. This phenomenon is known as size inflation, and it occurs when ready-to-wear garments become larger over time, even though they are the same nominal size.

Vanity sizing is a practice that plays with emotions and deflates self-esteem. Despite its negative impact on society, retailers do not follow uniform sizing guidelines. Therefore, the sizes of two clothes may be drastically different. Vanity sizing is a practice that needs to be put to an end. Retail stores should use uniform sizing guidelines, as they are not uniform in all stores.

To prevent this, manufacturers should stop using vanity sizing altogether. The practice of using smaller sizes has been around for a long time, but only recently have brands started changing from size six to size four. The smaller number makes women feel smaller, and they buy more clothing in the belief that they look smaller. This is the primary reason for vanity sizing. So, when did vanity sizing start? You’re probably thinking about a different question.

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